Session 3: Teaching for Our Changing Industry

Robin Landa will be on a panel of experts, including Doug Davis and Thomas Kemeny discussing education of advertising.

SESSION 3: TEACHING FOR OUR CHANGING INDUSTRY
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 12 PM–2 PM EDT Even without a global pandemic on our hands, the methods with which we teach and empower our students — and ourselves — are forever being adjusted, revamped, and reinvented. In this session, speakers will discuss some of the latest trends in educating students for advertising and design-related fields. As a participant, you’ll be able to chat and compare notes with other educators, with the hopes of bringing back new ways of thinking to your respective classrooms and programs.

SPEAKERS Douglas Davis — Chair, B.F.A. in Communication Design, New York City College of Technology Thomas Kemeny — Author/Freelance Copywriter Robin Landa — Distinguished Professor/Author, Kean University

There are plenty of obstacles and challenges facing education in 2020. With the Global Educators Summit, we hope that we can all come together to share our thoughts and experiences in order to take them on. We hope you’ll join us in August! GLOBAL EDUCATORS SUMMIT
August 3, 5 & 7, 2020 LEARN MORE + REGISTER

450 W. 31st St.
6th Floor
New York, NY 10001
212.979.1900

Chicago Speculative Futures Event: Reimagine

Using Art and Design to Imagine Alternate Worlds

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reimagine-using-art-and-design-to-imagine-alternate-worlds-tickets-113545583898

REIMAGINE is a panel talk with artists and designers who imagine alternate neighborhoods, societies, and worlds through their work.


Date And Time

Wed, July 29, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT

Join Chicago Speculative Futures for a moderated panel with Chicago artists where we will discuss the power of art and design to imagine alternate neighborhoods, societies, and worlds.

Artists and Projects:

“Dissecting Gang Lettering”

Sir Charles (artist)

Sir Charles is a pseudonym born from the gang violence that began to plague not only the streets in his neighborhood of Brighton Park, but also many other neighborhoods in Chicago. A drive-by shooting in 2015 at Shields Elementary School fueled his mission to combine Chicago gang lettering and culture with a personal twist of empowerment, forgiveness, and growth. This mission simultaneously documents personal struggles and battles with alcoholism and drug abuse as Sir Charles, or Life of a Busy Dad, as he’s also known, started a new chapter as a sober father for his daughter that continues to this day. In this panel, Sir Charles will dissect the gang letter font and discuss the connection between gang lettering and oppression, racism, segregation, and past economic issues, as well as the appeal of the lettering and its dual-lens in history.

“South Side Speculations”

Astha Thakkar (designer)

South Side Speculations asks what is possible for young people to investigate their neighborhoods’ histories and imagine how to build healthier and freer futures. Resisting progress narratives that promise things will always get better and nostalgic accounts of carefree pasts. This exhibition asks how economic, political, and cultural structures evolve in the past, present, and future. We imagine alternative physical and social infrastructures for neighborhoods and communities, detail complex social determinants of health, and ever-present policing. Redirecting our scale of imagination, we seek to challenge the idea that all problems have solutions. The work you will see, hear, and touch should provoke questions about how we want the future of Chicago’s South Side to look, as it resists easy answers based on dominant representations of the city today.

“The Fictional Nations of Föhn, Delta, and Afterlife”

Claire Rosas, Will Wright, Miguel Perez (artists), Heather Snyder Quinn (professor), Laura Rossi Garcia (exhibit designer)

As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, we are met with an overwhelming sense of uncertainty about our collective futures and identities. With an important election year before us in the United States, we wish to use this space to offer alternate ways of considering the idea of a “nation.” From peaceful utopias to unsettling technocratic states, The Fictional Nations of Föhn, Delta, and Holy Land presents three speculative societies that exist across time: a quiet mountainous sanctum in the Alps, erased from history; a colonized stratosphere, inhabited by evolved human lifeforms; and an afterlife devoid of earthly freedoms—not the eternal bliss for which we had hoped. Using design fiction to press the issue of what it means to live in a post-truth world, the exhibit showcases “real” artifacts and “factual” accounts from these three nations. The publications take the form of guidebooks, offering detailed records of their respective homelands—chronicling evolution, social unrest, customs, governments, design systems, and more. We present both the plausible and impossible within these narratives, hoping to convey a taste of the many possibilities our future world(s) can hold. These projects were created as part of an undergraduate design fiction assignment at DePaul University’s School of Design.

CFP Cross Journal Special Issue: Making Justice Together

Deadline for submissions: November 15, 2020.
Publication of special issue: June 2021.

Original papers are invited for peer-review that address one of the following three topics:

Generative Justice in Design

Journal: New Design Ideas (Azerbaijan)

Marginalized Identities in the Design of Aesthetics for Resistance

Journal: Image & Text (South Africa)

Interconnected Apart: Design Research(ers) in the Periphery, in Isolation

Journal: Wicked Solutions Annual (USA, forthcoming

About the Special Issue

Making Justice Together is a refereed cross-journal special issue edited by Audrey G. Bennett (University of Michigan, USA) that aims to face down injustice and inequity with the dissemination of criticism, history, research, and theory on the use of design resources collaboratively and cross-culturally to yield social justice. We intend the expression making justice together to be read in two ways. First, how can the collaborative processes of designing (making, fabricating, producing, prototyping, speculating, visualizing) integrate concepts of justice (inclusion, equity, diversity, access, freedom, democracy)? Second, how can the social process of justice (in institutions, civic spaces, legal systems, ecosystems, industry) benefit from design knowledge and resources?

Generative Justice in Design

co-edited by Ron Eglash, Ph.D., University of Michigan, USA

Journal: New Design Ideas (Azerbaijan)

Extractive economies, whether capitalist or communist, have similar failures. They extract value from ecological systems in the destruction of nature; from workers in the alienation of labor, and from civic life in the colonization of our social networks. The opposite is a generative economy: one in which value is not extracted, but rather circulated in unalienated form. For all three categories (ecological value, labor value, and social value) generative justice is defined as follows: The universal right to generate unalienated value and directly participate in its benefits; the rights of value generators to create their own conditions of production; and the rights of communities of value generation to nurture self-sustaining paths for its circulation. New opportunities for design in generative justice include agroecology, where forms of organic value circulate from plants to people and back again; commons-based peer production, which ranges from feminist makerspaces to localized currencies; and in platform cooperatives, where worker ownership is creating alternatives for everything from Uber to Facebook. By decolonizing the circular economy, design in generative justice exposes greenwashing and empowers Indigenous, anti-racist and queer theory critiques. How are designers facilitating generative justice, creating new innovations for unalienated value circulation that address grassroots empowerment, egalitarian futures, and ecological collaboration with our nonhuman allies? We seek original papers on this topic to be refereed for free publication in the New Design Ideas

Journal which is indexed in Scopus. Authors should follow the journal’s submission guidelines here and submit papers in APA style to Audrey Bennett (agbennet@umich.edu) and Ron Eglash (eglash@umich.edu)

Papers may take one of the following formats:

  • original articles (5000 words)
  • state-of-the-art reviews (2500 words)
  • short communications (1500 words)

Marginalized Identities in the Design of Aesthetics for Resistance

co-edited by Neeta Verma, University of Notre Dame, USA

Journal: Image & Text (South Africa)

From the Civil Rights era to present-day movements in the West like Me too and Black Lives Matter, it has been proven that organized resistance can make an impact on policy and bring about social change. Whereas historical protests typically have been centralized around leaders–Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights movement, Nelson Mandella and the Anti-Apartheid Movement, Mahatma Gandhi and the Quit India Movement through satyagraha (true principle and Ahimsa (non-violence)) for India’s Independence from Britain–today’s protests are more centralized around communication technology and media (e.g., #blacklivesmatter, #metoo, etc…). Movements no longer brand the leaders’ identities, instead they brand and operate around the core principles of the movements. What does it mean today to design for resistance particularly in the wake of the “lynching” of George Floyd by Minneapolis police? What are the affordances and constraints of marginalizing human identities and promoting mantras and slogans in the design of aesthetics for resistance? We seek original papers that address these questions and others to be refereed for publication in Image & Text. We invite original articles (5000 words) for peer review. Authors should follow the journal’s submission guidelines here and submit papers using Harvard Reference style to Audrey Bennett (agbennet@umich.edu) and Neeta Verma (nverma@nd.edu).

Interconnected Apart: Design Research(ers) in the Periphery, in Isolation

co-edited by Dan Wong, designincubation.com and New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Journal: Wicked Solutions Annual (USA, forthcoming)

Social distancing has created unprecedented challenges for underrepresented communities and the designers who work with them. The question is: When proximity and collaboration are constrained, what is the impact? This session will bring together designers who conduct research for and with underrepresented communities that are underserved, economically-disadvantaged, or marginalized. We seek papers that speak to the future of design research for and with communities within the periphery of society in terms of equity and access during this current period of social distancing. We also seek panelists who represent minority groups and can speak on related topics. We are particularly interested in design research and designers that “intersect” two or more underrepresented social and political identities and disciplines of design. We seek original papers on this topic to be refereed for publication in the new Wicked Solutions Research Annual of the CAA Committee on Design and Design Incubation. Papers should take the following format:

  • original articles (2500 words excluding bibliography) as Microsoft Word documents using Chicago Manual of Style, footnotes, and bibliography format for citations. The paper should include 1) Research question / Problem definition, 2) Methodology / Methods of data collection and analysis, 3) Data analysis and findings, 4) Conclusion, and 5) Bibliography. The content of your paper should include a statement of its original contribution to the discipline supported by an appropriate literature review. Please include four to six keywords with your paper.

Submit papers to Audrey Bennett (agbennet@umich.edu) and Dan Wong (dwong@citytech.cuny.edu).

RGD Educator Webinar June 25 – How do we teach true resilience in young designers?

Thursday, June 25 at 12 PM Eastern Time

This panel discusses how to balance the need to deliver crafted design content with the need to build resilient and resourceful designers for an ever-changing industry. The webinar will be structured in the following format: The moderator will start with questions for each of the panelists, then we move to an open forum and finally take questions from the audience. The webinar will be about 1 hour in length.

Our panelists will answer the following questions:

What does modern-day resiliency look like?

How do employers know they are getting a flexible, adaptable designer who can change and mold with the times?

Defining why we need resilient designers. Why does this matter just as much as their portfolio?

How do we prepare designers for complete shifts in the working experience and changes in delivery and content?

How do we both deliver and challenge the students to be resourceful and self sufficient? 

Panelists

Gail Anderson, Chair of BFA Design & BFA Advertising at the School of Visual Arts in NYC & Creative Director at Visual Arts Press at SVA

Greg Dubeau RGD, Part-time Professor at NSCAD University in Halifax & Freelance Graphic Designer

Hyein Lee RGD, Professor in BA Illustration program at Sheridan College in Oakville (ON) & Motion Designer

Saskia van Kampen RGD, Assistant Professor at San Francisco State University & Contemporary Visual

ArtistModerator: 

Bianca  DiPietro RGD, Program Coordinator & Professor at Humber College in Toronto Pricing RGD Members:

FREE Non-Members: One webinar – $30; Pkg of 4 – $100
Register here.

Others in this series

September 25: Student Edition – What did you not learn in school that you needed?

October 23: The facilitation versus delivery debate.

November 27: Connecting the industry to education. What can we do better?

Design and Culture: Call for Editorial Board Members

Design and Culture Call for Editorial Board Members: Associate Editors, Reviews Editors, Social Media Editor

Design and Culture, the official journal of the Design Studies Forum, is seeking scholars with an established record in the scholarship of design to join its international editorial board.  The Editorial Board, headed by the journal’s three editors-in-chief, is responsible for the operation of the journal.  The journal is currently published three times a year by Taylor and Francis.

Associate Editors
Associate Editors will participate in bi-annual or ad hoc internet meetings about the journal’s operation and strategic vision. They will actively promote the journal in their networks, will encourage the submission of high quality papers aligned to the journal’s vision, and will solicit special issues on emerging subjects of interest in the field. Associate Editors will guide the various stages of the -review process in accordance to the journal’s suggested timeline (they will be assigned 3-5 papers per year). They will be responsible for selecting and contacting peer reviewers, communicating with authors and reviewers, leading the revision and re-submission process, and producing recommendations to the editors-in-chief. Associate Editors are also expected to act as peer-reviewers per the request of other Associate Editors or the editors-in-chief. Associate Editors members should expect to dedicate a few days per month to the journal, and the initial appointment will be for three years. There is no remuneration for the position.

Reviews Editors
Reviews editors will work as a team of four under Reviews Editor-in-chief guidance, a position currently held by Maggie Taft. Reviews will include books, exhibitions and media, and each editor would likely be responsible for working on approximately six reviews per year. This would involve two annual e-meetings with the other review editors (i.e. email correspondence chains) to identify books, exhibitions, and media. Editors will interface with potential authors, distribute reviewer guidelines, set schedules for submission, and edit reviews through the revision process. Once complete, reviews are submitted to the journal’s editorial team at large. Review Editors will participate in additional bi-annual or ad hoc internet meetings about the journal’s operation and strategic vision. They will actively promote the journal in their networks. Review Editors should expect to dedicate a few days per month to the journal, and the initial appointment will be for three years. There is no remuneration for the position.

Social Media Editor
Social Media Editor will be responsible for the strategy and day-to-day operations of the journal’s social media presence across multiple platforms. We are looking for an academic or graduate student with both knowledge of design scholarship and experience in running social media platforms. Social Media Editor will participate in bi-annual or ad hoc internet meetings about the journal’s operation and strategic vision, and will be in contact with the editors-in-chief as needed. There is no remuneration for the position.

In your letter of interest please describe your scholarly expertise, and your experience with editorial or social media work.  To apply please email your letter of interest and CV to Laura McGuire at mcguirel@hawaii.edu by June 30, 2020, with the subject line DC_Associate Editor , DC_Reviews Editor, or DC_Social Media Editor depending on the position you are applying for.

TDC Announces June Virtual Salons

Virtual Events for June 2020

Here are the Type Directors Club’s upcoming June TDC Virtual Salon line-up, which is open for registration:

  • They still have room for you to join us on May 28, when writer/journalist Anne Quito and design legend Walter Bernard will discuss an epic period of magazine design as told in their book with Milton GlaserMag Men: Fifty Years of Making Magazines.
  • Next on June 4, take a trip to the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography with its curator, Alexander Tochilovsky, who will give you an overview of this amazing graphic-design resource in New York City and show you recent acquisitions of Japanese ephemera.
  • Next, on June 9th, they will join author, illustrator, and designer Ross MacDonald as they tour his studio and letterpress shop in  Connecticut. On view will be Ross’ extensive collection of wood type, dating back to some of the earliest cut by hand, as well as examples of period props that he has made, printed, and designed for over 90 movies and television series.
  • Then on June 11, Angelina Lippert, curator of Poster House, will talk about the history of the PSA (Public Service Announcement) poster. From Tuberculosis to Loose Lips Sink Ships, she’ll explore how information has been disseminated to the public for the greater good. She’ll start her talk with a brief introduction to Poster House, the first museum in the United States dedicated to the art and history of the poster.  (In the meantime, check out the museum’s special projects.)
  • Next, on June 18, designers Brenda McManus and Ned Drew will take you into the process behind their letterpress “labor of love” – a charming ABC book that brought together their family, students, type collection, and passion for printing into one inspiring project.
  • And on June 25, they invite you to meet Dylan Mulvaney, the head of design for Gretel, one of New York’s most forward-looking design studios, who will talk about typography and culture and how his team looks for resonance between the two. Take a look.

The TDC Virtual Salons are free to members. They encourage all of you to join TDC (check out the various membership options here), and they ask both members and non-members to make a small donation and help them continue this new effort to connect and serve the typography community online.

The recordings of their virtual salons are being prepared and will join the videos of all of their past salons that are on YouTube and their website.

Design Incubation Colloquium 6.3: Fordham University is moving Online!

Design Incubation Colloquium 6.3: Fordham University (#DI2020mar)
Virtual Conference May 16, 2020, 1PM EST.

Like all of you, Design Incubation is busy adapting to working from home and online. Please join us for our first Virtual Colloquium!

Learn about the research, creative projects and innovative teaching practices colleagues from around the country are working on. Join the moderated discussion and give the presenters feedback on their projects.

How it works:

  1. Register for the event (yes it’s FREE!).
  2. Watch the 10 pre-recorded presentations before the event, when it’s convenient for you.
  3. Join the moderated discussion and Q&A session via Zoom on Saturday, May 16, 2020 at 1pm EST (10am PST.)

We are working to find ways for faculty to continue to publish, present, and receive feedback on their research. This is our pilot program and we hope you will stay connected to the Design Incubation community as we continue to develop additional virtual programming over the summer.

Design Incubation Colloquium 6.3: Fordham University was originally scheduled to be held at Fordham University is Hosted by Abby Goldstein and the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University. This event is open to all interested in Communication Design research.

Teaching Online? Please Share Your Experiences

How have you adapted a class or course for remote instruction or online learning?

https://social.designincubation.com/topic/252-teaching-online-resources-experiences-tools-recommendations/

Have you created an online class or entire course? Please share your recommendations and experiences on our bulletin board. Click on the link above to join the discussion.

If this is the first time visiting our discussion forum, create a profile, and once approved, you can post freely anywhere on the website.

If you have questions or recommendations, please let us know at info@designincubation.com.

Between Heritage and Modernity: Modernity in Arabic Type Design

The Center for Book Arts is hosting a series of 3 seminars dedicated to Arabic type design and typography, curated by Dr. Nadine Chahine, taking place on March 5, 7, and 19.

The theme of the series revolves around concepts of modernity in Arabic type design, the heritage of Arabic letterforms in the context of current technologies, contemporary Arabic branding design, and the history of Arab graphic design. The series brings together renowned and award winning designers working with Arabic type, both from the US and the Middle East.

The first panel discussion of the 2020 History of Art Series will be on Modernity in Arabic Type Design. The evening will feature Wael Morcos, with a talk entitled Right to Left: A Practice, Dr. Nadine Chahine discussing The Politics of Arabic Graphic Design, and Thomas Jockin, who will be presenting Two Decades of Type Directors Club Award-Winning Arabic Typefaces.

This History of Art seminar will be on Contemporary Arabic Graphic Design. The afternoon will feature Tarek Atrissi, who will be discussing Branding with Arabic Typography; Tala Safié will be presenting, “Haza al Massa” (or “Tonight”), a documentation of the golden years of Lebanese cinema through posters, zines, press books, and film ephemera; and Bahia Shehab, who will be giving a discussion entitled, From Calligraphers to Type designers: Arabic Script in Transition.

The final panel discussion of the 2020 History of Art Series will be on Technology and Heritage. The evening will feature Dave Crossland who will discuss Variable Fonts, and Mamoun Sakkal, who will discuss Calligraphy, Type, Image: A Journey into Arabic Script.

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St. Third Floor
New York, NY
10001

RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/between-heritage-and-modernity-technology-and-heritage-tickets-86609363939

With a Cast of Colored Stars – A Talk with Kelly Walters @tdc

DATE: Tuesday, March 10, 2020
TIME: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
LOCATION: Type Directors Club
347 W 36th St.
Suite 603
New York, NY 10018

Through historical archival research and the act of experimental printmaking, Kelly Walters research aims to highlight the linguistic phrases used in promotional Black film posters during the Jim Crow through Blaxploitation eras. By extracting typographic elements such as “an all colored cast” or “with a cast of colored stars,” Kelly Walters is able to closely examine examples of segregation while also re-contextualizing them for new alternative platforms. In looking closely at typographic details, language, and gestures, identifiable patterns emerge pointing to shifts in communication styles and cultural representation in this area of poster design.

https://www.tdc.org/event/with-a-cast-of-colored-stars-a-talk-with-kelly-walters/