Climate Designers EDU: Climify Design Projects

How educators bring climate-related projects and parameters into the classrooms

Sat, January 9, 2021
12:30pm – 2:00pm EST
Zoom Meeting

College students today are more aware of our climate crisis than previous generations. Many are actively looking for ways to use their creative talents to take much needed climate action in the classroom and out.

During this event, design educators are invited to join members of the Climate Designers EDU team as they share their own work and answer questions about how educators can bring climate-related projects and parameters into their classrooms.

The Climate Designers EDU team will provide an overview of the CD EDU initiative, share student work, demo their v1 climate project submission process, and answer any questions educators might have about the initiative or how to “climify” design projects. 

AIGA Design Educators Community SHIFT 2020 Virtual Summit

Service Award Runner-Up

In the summer of 2020, design educators were exhausted. They had just finished a spring semester unlike any other, in which halfway through they were required to quickly transition their classes to a remote format due to a global pandemic. Many had lost access to childcare; many were home schooling their young children. As they looked ahead to the fall—another uncertain and tenuous semester as a global health crisis continued to unfold—the anxiety and lack of support they felt was palpable.

The AIGA Design Educators Community Steering Committee felt this firsthand. We knew something had to be done to support educators during such a challenging and uncertain time. Most design conferences had been cancelled or postponed, including the AIGA national conference. We decided to convene our first virtual conference to directly address the issues weighing heavily on educators. We called it the SHIFT 2020 Virtual Summit.

About the event

The events of 2020 required design educators to shift many things: priorities, expectations, formats, locations, modalities, and perspectives. The suddenness of these shifts also revealed many previously unseen or overlooked aspects of design education: weaknesses, biases, inequities, issues of accessibility—as well as opportunities for innovation and evolution. Questions lingered about what it means to be a design educator and what our role might look like in the future. The SHIFT Virtual Summit, Aug. 3-7, was a week-long online event that gathered the design education community to take stock of where we were, what we had learned, and what we wanted to do next. The summit focused on themes of Teaching, Research, and Community, with one day of the summit devoted to each theme. We wanted to create a space that allowed participants to pause, listen, reflect, and learn from each other. Through dialogue and discourse, we aimed to explore pluralistic answers to the following questions:

  • How must our teaching shift?
  • How must our research shift?
  • How must our community shift?
The content

The primary goal of the summit was to bring together as many different voices and perspectives as possible, especially those that have been historically underrepresented in conversations around design education. As such, we decided to forego the traditional call for proposals and peer review process, and instead opted for an intentional arrangement of curated content. We identified key issues and topics that were of interest to educators in the current moment, and hand-selected speakers and panelists who would provide diverse perspectives and expertise. Some of the topics addressed: inclusion in the classroom, virtual critiques, decolonial design, global community, design in k-12 education, design educators and mental health, inclusive graphic design history, tenure and promotion, sponsored research and studios, and more. View the full list of events on the DEC website: https://educators.aiga.org/shift-2020/

It was important to us that the participant experience was manageable and accessible for all, so we planned both synchronous and asynchronous content, and a schedule that accommodated multiple time zones. The events of the summit took many formats: pre-recorded panels, user-submitted videos, live panels, live virtual roundtables, and live virtual mixer sessions. All pre-recorded videos included closed captioning, and many live events included ASL interpreters. All sessions were recorded and can be viewed on the AIGA DEC Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQo7UMhLPFcb_Mbw4zCXks_BQcg337cZ7

Another fundamental aspect of the conference was to provide opportunities for connection amongst participants. Many virtual meetings and webinars tend to isolate participants and create disjointed experiences. We wanted to bring people together. Our main hub for the week was Slack. Channels were created for each of the three themes, teaching, research, community, as well as for introductions, social chatter and general announcements. Conversations about the panels and video content were carried out in Slack each day. Throughout the week, volunteers helped to moderate the conversations.

The organizers

The summit was a 100% volunteer-run event, and free and open to all design educators. AIGA DEC Steering Committee members Alberto Rigau, Liese Zahabi and Ali Place co-chaired the event. It was developed in partnership with the AIGA Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Task Force. The summit would not have been possible without the DEC Steering Committee members, DEI Task Force members and numerous other educators who generously volunteered their time and effort to make the event a resounding success. We cannot thank them enough for their contributions.

To keep the summit free and open to all, we capitalized on the affordances of free digital tools and platforms, such as Slack and YouTube. The DEC received funding from AIGA National to upgrade the DEC Zoom account and to provide ASL interpretation at live sessions. 

The outcome

The SHIFT Virtual Summit was an incredible success that surpassed all our expectations. At the end of the week, 1,200 participants had registered and joined our Slack community (more than four times number of participants at the largest DEC conference to date). What surprised us even more was the global reach of the event—more than 25 countries were represented. Pre-recorded videos garnered hundreds of views. The live roundtable discussions were full of insightful and forward-thinking ideas. The Slack channels were buzzing with boisterous conversations that were thoughtful and caring. Threads popped up about crucial topics like supporting students who can’t afford laptop computers, how to teach community-oriented service learning courses remotely, and what it’s like to be a mother on the tenure track. Participants had a chance to share stories, seek advice and offer words of encouragement. It was a beautiful display of connection and community.

The outcomes of the SHIFT Virtual Summit will take the form of a Living Archive. Rather than a static collection of papers written by a handful of people, we wanted to capture ideas shared and discussed during the summit and make it accessible and editable by our attendees. The Living Archive includes resources shared, tips and tricks, ideas, links, quotes, discussions and debates, and more, culled from the Slack channels as well as the chat transcripts from live sessions. In addition, we announced a call for submissions for materials from and about the summit. We are seeking various types of submissions, including research-based papers, visual expressions, practical and hands-on submissions, and other kinds of writing which will be peer-reviewed and edited together in a publication that will also be part of the SHIFT Living Archive.

Alison Place is a design educator, researcher and practitioner. Her research examines the intersection of feminism and design as a space for radical speculation and critical making. She is currently writing a book that aims to define feminist design through key principles, methods, interviews and case studies. She is an assistant professor of graphic design at the University of Arkansas School of Art, and is currently serving as interim director of the graphic design program. She is also a member of the AIGA Design Educators Community National Steering Committee. Previously, she worked for more than ten years as a creative director and designer for higher education and nonprofit institutions. She earned an M.F.A. in experience design from Miami University of Ohio, and a B.S. in graphic design and journalism from the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

Liese Zahabi is a graphic/interaction designer and Assistant Professor of Design at the University of New Hampshire. She received her Master of Graphic Design from North Carolina State University, and her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Eastern Michigan University. She has been working as a designer for twenty years, and teaches courses in graphic design, interaction design, motion design and animation, typography, game design, user experience and design research. Liese’s academic research focuses on search as a cognitive and cultural process, and how the design of metaphoric interfaces can change the experience of digital search tasks. Her creative design work is also metaphorical and explores how the nature of search manifests itself in visual patterns and sense-making, how the digital record influences memory and our understanding of history, and how language and image intersect within the context of the Internet.

Alberto Rigau is a graduate of the Masters in Graphic Design program at NC State University’s College of Design and a Poynter Institute Visual Journalism Fellow. He pursued undergraduate studies in cultural anthropology, graphic design and photography at Syracuse University. He runs Estudio Interlínea, a design studio that engages design and anthropology through the crafting and conceptualization of brands, exhibits, way-finding systems, publications, books, architectural collaborations of an interpretative nature. Alberto’s work has been recognized here and abroad. He currently lectures on design thinking methodologies and creativity as a tool to ignite meaningful cultural experiences.

Design Incubation Communication Design Awards 2020 recipient

Why Design Educators Should Embrace Collaborative (Group) Work in the Design Classroom 

Students apply for a specific role that was provided with a list of job responsibilities

Abby Guido
Assistant Professor
Tyler School of Art and Architecture

While the design industry has shifted from the individual designer creating work in a silo to a more collaborative approach, relying on both diversity of thought and expertise, design education is falling behind, where the focus is often on the individual and the iterative process of incorporating feedback, design students are missing a key component to becoming a successful designer today: learning how to be strong team members, how to generate diverse ideas, how to be thoughtful leaders, among other soft skills. As the design industry continues to embrace collaboration, design educators should explore how to better expose students to group design work in their curriculum. 

In the past, I have assigned group projects that allowed the students to select their roles and responsibilities with their teammates. While this has sometimes worked, more often it did not and I found myself spending most of my time helping the team push through personal issues, rather than focusing on the work itself. In response, I changed my approach in a course during the spring of 2020 called, “Event Design.” I had my students apply for a specific role that was provided with a list of job responsibilities, on a specific project team for a given event we would be designing for. This approach was much more successful, the students embraced their roles, created beautiful work, and were able to seamlessly pivot when our project and course had to majorly adjust due to the coronavirus and the cancelation of the in-person events we were designing for. 

The students in this course shared that their experience collaborating allowed them to learn new skills they had not considered needing to know. I witnessed a huge change in all of the students, and an opportunity to help better prepare our students for their careers. 

This research was presented at the Design Incubation Colloquium 7.1: Oakland University, MI on October 17, 2020.

Graphic Design Principles: A History- And Context-Based First-Year Design Textbook

Insight into the process of design innovation, influence, and interpretation

Anita Giraldo
Associate Professor
New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Patricia Childers
Adjunct Professor
New York City College of Technology, CUNY

In teaching first-year students, we find that most have definite “style” preferences. However, many have little idea about the nuances that resonate with them. While still in its development phase, research has begun into a design textbook to teach various design principles by scaffolding skills and design history to complete a series of one-semester projects. This book aims to bridge the gap between creation and context so that students can make informed design decisions.

Integral to this project is the awareness of the often-overlooked influences and lack of diversity in the cannon of graphic design. Students’ research interests will not be limited. Instead, students are encouraged to contribute to design history by introducing objects or designers that are not part of the cannon. The range of student contributions will create an overview of a specific time and place.

The projects include the development of a graphic image, a hand-drawn typographic project, and a three-dimensional or time-based media project. It culminates in the design of a tribute poster to a significant graphic or industrial designer.

The book covers many aspects and principles of graphic design. However, this is a book for a freshmen design course. The outcome is to open the door to how visual elements influence the viewer and solve problems and laying the foundation for true design thinking. With insight into the process of design innovation, influence, and interpretation, student will be better prepared to advance their design study with a better understanding of the layered process of design.

This research was presented at the Design Incubation Colloquium 7.1: Oakland University, MI on October 17, 2020.

Design Incubation Colloquium 7.1: Oakland University

A Virtual Conference October 17, 2020, 1PM EST.

Presentations will be published on the Design Incubation YouTube Channel after October 3, 2020. Virtual Conference will be held online on Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 1pm EST.

Colloquium 7.1: Oakland University (#DI2020oct) will be held online. Registration for this event below.

Hosted by Maria Smith Bohannon and the Dept of Art and Art History at Oakland University, MI. This event is open to all interested in Communication Design research.

Presentations

A Design Conversation of the Interaction between Iranian and American Visual Culture
Setareh Ghoreishi
Assistant Professor
Oakland University

Exploring Connections between Environment and Community Through Design
Danilo Bojic
Assistant Professor
Winona State University

The Machine Hand
Ryan Molloy
Professor
Eastern Michigan University

Let’s Stay Neighbors: A Case Study in Civic Engagement
Chad Reichert
Professor
College for Creative Studies, MI

Sustainable Design Thinking: Changing the Design Process
Maria Smith Bohannon
Assistant Professor
Oakland University, MI

Graphic Design Principles: A History- And Context-Based First-Year Design Textbook
Anita Giraldo
Associate Professor
New York City College of Technology, CUNY

Patricia Childers
Adjunct Professor
New York City College of Technology, CUNY

The Children of Loki: Pairing Norse Mythology With Contemporary Visuals to Create a Provocative Narrative
Jimmy Henderson
Graphic Designer

Jimmy Henderson | Design & Illustration

Core Values Matter: The Role of the People in Shaping Corporate Responsibility
Lilian Crum
Assistant Professor
Lawrence Technological University

Why Design Educators Should Embrace Collaborative (Group) Work in the Design Classroom 
Abby Guido
Assistant Professor
Tyler School of Art and Architecture

Colloquium 7.2: CAA Conference 2021 Call for Submissions

109th CAA Annual Conference, Virtual.
Deadline for abstract submissions: September 16, 2020.

We invite abstract submissions on presentation topics relevant to Communication Design research. Submissions should fall into one or more of the following areas: scholarly research, case studies, creative practice, or design pedagogy. We welcome proposals on a variety of topics across the field of communication design.

Accepted researchers will be required to produce a 6-minute videotaped presentation that will be published on the Design Incubation channel. The CAA conference session will consist of a moderated discussion of those presentations.

Submit an abstract of 300 words using the Design Incubation abstract submission form found here:
https://designincubation.com/call-for-submissions/

Submissions are double-blind peer-reviewed. Reviewers’ feedback will be returned. Accepted presentation abstracts will be published on the Design Incubation website.

109th CAA Annual Conference
February 10–13, 2021

Exact date and time, to be determined. This is a virtual conference event. Presenters will follow the basic membership and fee requirements of CAA.

We are accepting abstracts for presentations now until September 16, 2020.

Colloquium 7.3: Florida Atlantic University, Call for Submissions

Call for design research abstracts. Deadline: Saturday, January 9, 2021.

Submission Deadline: Saturday, January 9, 2021.

Event date: Saturday, April 10, 2021.

We invite designers—practitioners and educators—to submit abstracts of design research. This is a virtual event format.

Double-blind peer-reviewed colloquium abstracts will be published online. Please review the articles, Quick Start Guide for Writing Abstracts and Writing an Academic Research Abstract: For Communication Design Scholars prior to submitting.

Accepted presentations will be videotaped by the researchers and published online on the Design Incubation channel which are due by March 27, 2021. A moderated discussion will be held virtually on April 10, 2021. We encourage all attendees to watch the videos in advance of the moderated discussion. This event is open to all interested in Communication Design research.

Hosted by Camila Afanador-Llach, Assistant Professor + Graduate Coordinator, Graphic Design in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters at Florida Atlantic University

Presentations format is Pecha Kucha.

For more details, see the colloquia details and description. Abstracts can be submitted online for peer review.

Session 3: Teaching for Our Changing Industry

Robin Landa will be on a panel of experts, including Doug Davis and Thomas Kemeny discussing education of advertising.

SESSION 3: TEACHING FOR OUR CHANGING INDUSTRY
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 12 PM–2 PM EDT Even without a global pandemic on our hands, the methods with which we teach and empower our students — and ourselves — are forever being adjusted, revamped, and reinvented. In this session, speakers will discuss some of the latest trends in educating students for advertising and design-related fields. As a participant, you’ll be able to chat and compare notes with other educators, with the hopes of bringing back new ways of thinking to your respective classrooms and programs.

SPEAKERS Douglas Davis — Chair, B.F.A. in Communication Design, New York City College of Technology Thomas Kemeny — Author/Freelance Copywriter Robin Landa — Distinguished Professor/Author, Kean University

There are plenty of obstacles and challenges facing education in 2020. With the Global Educators Summit, we hope that we can all come together to share our thoughts and experiences in order to take them on. We hope you’ll join us in August! GLOBAL EDUCATORS SUMMIT
August 3, 5 & 7, 2020 LEARN MORE + REGISTER

450 W. 31st St.
6th Floor
New York, NY 10001
212.979.1900

Design Incubation Writing Groups

Two groups, based on scheduling preferences and project type, are open to academics, researchers, and writers working in the field of communication design.

Design Incubation is pleased to announce a Writing Group program for the 2020–21 academic year.

Scholarly writing is an integral part of many design faculty’s research agenda. As designers and writers, we know it can be daunting to sit down in front of a blank screen. Participating in a writing group provides structure, support and feedback. It’s also a way to build accountability into your writing practice.

For a writing group to work, it requires a serious, regular commitment from each member. For this inaugural program, Design Incubation will assemble two groups based on scheduling preferences and project type. Details on the structure and varying levels of commitment for each of the two groups are outlined below. Groups are open to academics, researchers, and writers working in the field of communication design. We will give preference to full-time faculty. (At this time we are not accepting graduate students.) The cost is $55 for the year. Ten spots are available for the 2020/21 academic year.

Each group will have a participant who is the designated Coordinator, responsible for light administrative work, including scheduling meetings; maintaining group accountability goals; and communicating with the Writing Group program DI Chairs to provide updates on group progress and ongoing feedback on the program. Design Incubation will recognize the Coordinators on their website and the position can be used to demonstrate service to an organization at a national level.

Applications will be considered immediately upon submission and they can be submitted through August 5th, 2020 (Due to an overwhelming response, we have closed applications early). Design Incubation will provide official letters of acceptance to allow attendees to request funding from their institutions.

2020–21 Pilot Launch Groups

Each group will set a regular day and time to meet throughout the semester. A fixed meeting time reinforces the notion that your writing practice takes priority and promotes accountability.

Weekly Writing Accountability 

Best for: Faculty, writers, or researchers looking for accountability to establish a writing practice.

Description: The weekly accountability Writing Group will provide a support network for establishing a regular writing practice and help group members set and achieve goals related to writing and/or research. In addition to participating in weekly video conference meetings, members will be responsible for presenting a writing/research plan, maintaining a writing log, and completing readings related to writing. 

1-hour video conference call every week from August 2020–May 2021

Responsibilities:

  • Create a research/writing plan that details your project(s) and timeline(s)
  • Maintain a writing log including dates, times, and activity
  • Complete group-related assignments that may include readings, podcast episodes, or writing exercises

Bi-Weekly Writing Accountability 

Best for: Faculty, writers, or researchers looking for accountability to establish a writing practice but who cannot accommodate weekly meetings.

Description: The bi-weekly accountability Writing Group will provide a support network for establishing a regular writing practice and help group members set and achieve goals related to writing and/or research. In addition to participating in bi-weekly video conference meetings, members will be responsible for presenting a writing/research plan, maintaining a writing log, and completing readings related to writing. 

1-hour video conference call every other week from August 2020–May 2021

Responsibilities:

  • Create a research/writing plan that details your project(s) and timeline(s)
  • Maintain a writing log including dates, times, and activity
  • Complete group-related assignments that may include readings, podcast episodes, or writing exercises

Proviso: If you don’t show up for three meetings in a row, you may be dropped from the group. 

The 2020 Design Incubation Communication Design Awards

2020 Design Incubation Educators Awards competition in 4 categories: Creative Work, Published Research, Teaching, Service

Congratulation to the recipients of the 2020 Communication Design Awards!

Scholarship: Creative Works Awards

Winner: Cradlr: A Design Project for Refugee Children

Jing Zhou
Associate Professor
Department of Art and Design
Monmouth University

Runner-up: afFEMation.com

Jane Connory
Lecturer
Art, Design & Architecture
Swinburne University of Technology and Monash University

Scholarship: Published Research

None awarded

Service Award

Winner: Diseño y diáspora podcast

Mariana Salgado
Service Designer/ Lecturer
Ministry of the Interior in Finland

Andrés Fechtenholz
Julian Pereyra
Antonio Zimmermann
Mercedes Salgado

Runner-up: AIGA Design Educators Community SHIFT 2020 Virtual Summit

Alison Place
Assistant Professor
University of Arkansas

Liese Zahabi
Assistant Professor
University of New Hampshire

Alberto Rigau
Estudio Interlínea

Teaching Award

Winner: If This is Theory, Why Isn’t It Boring? Connecting traditional text[book]s to real-life contexts with Augmented Reality

Deborah Littlejohn
Associate Professor
College of Design
North Carolina State University

Special Award – joint winners

Jury Commendation for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Scholarship: Creative Works: Expanding the Canon:

Jane Connory

Service: Expanding the Canon:

Mariana Salgado

Graduate Student Awards

None awarded

ABOUT THE 2020 JURY

Gail Anderson is an NYC-based designer, educator, and writer. She is Chair of BFA Design and BFA Advertising at the School of Visual Arts, and the creative director at Visual Arts Press. Anderson has served as a senior art director at Rolling Stone, creative director of design at SpotCo, and as a designer at The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine and Vintage Books. She has taught at SVA for close to thirty years and has co-authored 15 books on design, typography, and illustration with the fabulous Steven Heller. Anderson serves on the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee for the US Postal Service and the advisory board of Poster House. She is an AIGA Medalist and the 2018 recipient of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Lifetime Achievement Award for Design. Her work is represented in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, the Milton Glaser Design Archives, and the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Fatima Cassim, Ph.D., heads the Information Design division in the Department of Visual Arts at the University Pretoria, South Africa. In 2012, she received a Harvard South African Fellowship for a research residency at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Her research focuses on the culture of design; in particular, she is interested in design activism and the possible impact it may have on design citizenship. Dr. Cassim is the co-editor of the accredited Image & Text journal and the Director of Education on the board of directors for Open Design, a South African NGO that uses and promotes design to innovate, educate and build resilient communities.

Denise Gonzales Crisp is a Professor of Graphic Design and Director of Graduate Programs for Graphic Design at North Carolina State University College of Design. She is the author of Graphic Design in Context: Typography (Thames & Hudson, 2011). Her juried and commissioned essays have been published in Design and Culture Journal, Design Observer, Design Research, The Design Dictionary, and other notable anthologies. Gonzales Crisp is a contributing editorial board member for Design and Culture Journal. A member of the graphic design professional organization American Institute of Graphic Arts since 1989, she has served on the Los Angeles chapter’s advisory board.

Paul J. Nini is a Professor and past Chairperson in the Department of Design at The Ohio State University, where he has also acted as Graduate Studies Chair and Coordinator of the Visual Communication Design undergraduate program. His professional service activities have included: board member of the Graphic Design Education Association; member of AIGA’s Design Educators Community steering committee; editorial board member for the ico-D journal Communication Design: Interdisciplinary and Graphic Design Research; and advisory board member for AIGA’s Dialectic journal. A collection of his academic writing can be found at – https://medium.com/@pjn123.

Maria Rogal is a Professor of Graphic Design and leads the new Design & Visual Communications MFA at the University of Florida. She is the founder of D4D Lab, an award-winning initiative to co-design with indigenous entrepreneurs and subject matter experts to generate sustainable local outcomes supporting self-determination. She has lectured and published about social and co-design, recently co-authoring “CoDesigning for Development,” which appears in The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Design. Her research has been funded by AIGA, Sappi, and Fulbright programs, among others, and her creative design work has been featured in national and international juried exhibitions.

Teal Triggs, Ph.D., (Chair) is a Professor of Graphic Design and leads on the MPhil/Ph.D. programme in the School of Communication, Royal College of Art, London. As a graphic design historian, researcher and educator she lectures and broadcasts widely and her writings have appeared in numerous international design publications and edited books. Her recent books include: co-editor of The Graphic Design Reader (Bloomsbury), author of Fanzines (Thames & Hudson), and The School of Art (Wide Eyed) which was shortlisted for the ALCS 2016 Educational Writer’s Award. She is a Fellow of the Design Research Society, International Society of Typographic Designers and the Royal Society of Arts.

Design Incubation announces a call for nominations and entries for the 2020 awards for communication design educators and graduate students in the areas of scholarship, teaching, service. The aim of the awards program is to discover and recognize new scholarship (creative work and publications), teaching, and service in our broad and varied discipline. We hope to expand the design record, promote excellence and share knowledge within the field. 

This year, the jury also will be considering commendations for work covering the area of diversity, equity, access, and inclusion in communication design. We encourage submissions of work that relate to these areas for consideration.

Nominations

We kindly ask colleagues and mentors to identify outstanding creative work, publications, teaching, and service being done by design educators and graduate students in our field and to nominate these individuals for an award. Nominations will be accepted from April 15 to July 31, 2020. 

Entry Guidelines

Entries will be accepted from June 1–August 31, 2020. Complete the online entry form with the following:

  • Title: Description of project and outcomes (not to exceed 500 words)
  • Supporting Materials (limited to 5-page medium resolution pdf of artwork; web links to websites, videos, other online resources; published documents or visual documents)
  • Bio of applicant/s (150 words per applicant)
  • Curriculum vitae of applicant/s

New Initiative for the 2020 Design Incubation Awards: Graduate Student Work 

Beginning this year, Design Incubation is accepting entries in a new juried area of Graduate Student Work. The future of communication design education begins with the work of future faculty and researchers in the field of Communication Design. Recognition of graduate student work will be grouped and reviewed in the categories of scholarship, creative projects, and service. Graduate students currently enrolled in graduate design programs are invited to submit scholarship, creative projects, and service projects they completed during graduate study or up to one year after graduation.